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Thursday, July 30, 2020 | History

1 edition of Mitigating climate change through food and land use found in the catalog.

Mitigating climate change through food and land use

Sara J. Scherr

Mitigating climate change through food and land use

by Sara J. Scherr

  • 238 Want to read
  • 20 Currently reading

Published by Ecoagriculture Partners and Worldwatch Institute in Washington, D.C .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Sustainable agriculture,
  • Land use,
  • Agricultural ecology,
  • Climatic changes,
  • Agriculture,
  • Environmental aspects,
  • Land use and energy conservation,
  • Biodiversity conservation

  • About the Edition

    Wise and locally appropriate investments in land use can bring diverse benefits for food security, rural livelihoods, and ecosystem protection.

    Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references (p. 40-43) and index.

    StatementSara J. Scherr and Sajal Sthapit ; Lisa Mastny, editor
    SeriesWorldwatch report -- 179, Worldwatch report -- 179.
    ContributionsSthapit, Sajal, Mastny, Lisa
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsS589.7 .S37 2009
    The Physical Object
    Pagination48 p. :
    Number of Pages48
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL25224411M
    ISBN 101878071912
    ISBN 109781878071910
    LC Control Number2012359224
    OCLC/WorldCa390402147

    Assessing the efficiency of changes in land use for mitigating climate change Article (Online only version available) in Nature () December with 1, Reads How we .   It looks like this is desirable and achievable. First challenge: Most of India's emissions come from energy (largely coal-based) production (68%), industry (20%), agriculture, food and land use (10%).

    1 day ago  A recent study led by NUS researchers showed that practical considerations, beyond where trees could be planted, may limit the climate change mitigation potential of reforestation. Hence, there is. effects of climate and land-use change on potential carbon sequestration and ecosystem benefits, and to provide information about these effects for use in resource planning. The term “carbon sequestration” is used to describe both natural and deliberate processes by which CO 2 is either removed from the atmosphere or diverted from.

      The document, prepared by scientists for the UN's Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), says that if land is used more effectively, it can store more of the carbon emitted by humans. Planting a well-planned woodland on land that is marginal for agricultural use can help to provide shelter for cattle and sheep, as well as providing the farmer with a decent pension on retirement.


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Mitigating Climate Change Through Food and Land Use - Kindle edition by Scherr, Sara J., Sthapit, Sajal. Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets.

Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading Mitigating Climate Change Through Food and Land by: Get this from a library. Mitigating climate change through food and land use. [Sara J Scherr; Sajal Sthapit; Lisa Mastny] -- Wise and locally appropriate investments in land use can bring diverse benefits for food security, rural livelihoods, and ecosystem protection.

6 Mitigating Climate Change Through Food and Land Use c arbon at field scales for many diverse prac- tices and components of the landscape (soils. Land makes up a quarter of Earth's surface, and its soil and plants hold three times as much carbon as the atmosphere.

More than 30 percent of all greenhouse gas emissions arise from the land use sector. Thus, no strategy for mitigating global climate change can be complete or successful without reducing emissions from agriculture, forestry, and other land by: An illustration of an open book. Books.

An illustration of two cells of a film strip. Video. An illustration of an audio speaker. Audio. An illustration of a " floppy disk. Mitigating climate change through food and land use Item Preview remove-circle Share or Embed This Item.

Climate change mitigation consists of actions to limit the magnitude or rate of global warming and its related effects. This generally involves reductions in human emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs). Fossil fuels account for about 70% of GHG emissions. The main challenge is to eliminate the use of coal, oil and gas and substitute these fossil fuels with clean energy sources.

Despite their benefits in addressing desertification, mitigating and adapting to climate change, and increasing food and economic security, many SLM practices are not widely adopted due to insecure land tenure, lack of access to credit and agricultural advisory services, and insufficient incentives for private land-users (robust evidence, high.

Blog: Mitigating climate change by implementing the high conservation value approach; Indonesia haze sends a clear message on climate; Blog: Returning to Our Roots: Saving Forests and Curbing Climate Change; Protecting a forest across generations; Strengthening Land Tenure through Participatory Land-use Mapping in the Democratic Republic of Congo.

Land degradation is a global challenge that affects everybody through food insecurity and higher food prices, through climate change and environmental hazards, and through the loss of biodiversity and ecosystem services. Although there is a link between land degradation and conflict, we should be careful not to blame the victims.

Dolginow, A. “Strategies for Mitigating Climate Change in Agriculture: Abridged Report.” Climate Focus and California Environmental Associates, prepared with the support of the Climate and Land Use Alliance.

Report and supplementary materials available at: AUTHORS: Amy Dickie 1 Charlotte Streck2. Buy Mitigating Climate Change Through Food and Land Use (Worldwatch Report) on FREE SHIPPING on qualified orders Mitigating Climate Change Through Food and Land Use (Worldwatch Report): Scherr, Sara J., Sthapit, Sajal: : Books.

Mitigating Climate Change Through Food and Land Use. Land makes up a quarter of Earth’s surface, and its soil and plants hold three times as much carbon as the atmosphere.

More than 30 percent of all greenhouse gas emissions arise from the land use sector. Thus, no strategy for mitigating global climate change can be complete or successful. The page report, New York Agriculture and Climate Change: Key Opportunities for Mitigation, Resilience, and Adaptation, provides a scientific assessment of opportunities and barriers supporting.

Climate change mitigation as a co-benefit of regenerative ranching: insights from Australia and the United States. Interface Focus, ; 10 (5): DOI: /rsfs When it comes to tackling climate change to prevent the impacts it causes in the different systems of the planet, the human being applies two types of measures: mitigation and adaptation.

Mitigation measures are those actions that are taken to reduce and curb greenhouse gas emissions, while adaptation measures are based on reducing vulnerability to the effects of climate change.

Enhancing the capacity of individuals and enriching the enabling environment in developing countries can simplify efforts to address climate change in agriculture.

Robust data and strong institutional arrangements can facilitate the identification of feasible and effective climate change mitigation options in the agriculture and land use sectors.

Other Land Use (AFOLU). Food demand Increases in production are linked to consumption changes. Desertification and land degradation Land-use change, land-use intensification and climate change have contributed to desertification and land degradation.

CHANGE in % rel. to and CHANGE in % rel. to and 1 2 3 % % % 4. Forests play a number of essential roles at global scale, from maintaining biological diversity to mitigating climate change.

However, forests around the world are being rapidly cleared to make space for food production, threatening their continued provision of ecosystem services.

The United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change acknowledges that land use can contribute significantly to mitigation of climate change, including through the promotion of sustainable management of forests and oceans as well as other terrestrial, coastal and marine ecosystems.

The Convention also indicates that land use will need to. Hicks, a lawyer who visits his property weekly, if hopeful that untouched grasslands in Texas and across the country can help mitigate climate change. The Hicks property is official.

Climate Change Mitigation of Climate Change - by Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change January Skip to main content Accessibility help We use cookies to distinguish you from other users and to provide you with a better experience on our websites.

As already mentioned climate change mitigation through C sequestration depends on the establishment of a stable plant cover. Land-use changes, such as those due to afforestation and management of fast-growing tree species, may affect the regional rate of C sequestration by incorporating carbon dioxide (CO 2) in plant biomass and soil (Jandl.Climate actions have often fallen into one of two strategies: mitigation efforts to lower or remove greenhouse gas emissions from the atmosphere, and adaptation efforts to adjust systems and societies to withstand the impacts of climate change.

The separation has led to the misinformed view that addressing climate change means pursuing either mitigation or adaptation.